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Full text of "Psycho-physical exercise"

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THE 

ABNER WELLBORN CALHOUN 

MEDICAL LIBRARY 

1923 




Class. 



Book 



PRESENTED BY 



PSYCHO-PHYSICAL 
EXERCISE 



FORMULATED BY 

WILLIS B. PARKS, M.D. 

■\ 

ATLANTA, GA. 



IGAL10EPT. LIBR 

EMORY UNIVERSITY 

DEDICATED 

TO 

SUFFERING HUMANITY 



ATLANTA, GA. 
The Franklin Printing and Publishing Co. 

IQ02 

££°3X ;.. UNIVERSITY 

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Copyrighted 1902 
By W. B PARKS, M. D. 



INTRODUCTION. 



Since the laiety and the advertising "shyester" think they 
are capable of prescribing their own exercise, or formulating 
their own physicial culture, as it is called in the popular mag- 
azines, with a view of atheletic sports, etc., the medical pro- 
fession, as a rule, have stood aloof, and allowed one of the 
most important and legitimate remedial agents to become fear- 
fully mutilated, and misapplied, by those who do not under- 
stand the first principles of exercise or its effects on the human 
system. 

The anatomical mechanism and the physiological function- 
ating of the human system, requires in regard to prescribing 
exercises, as much medical intelligence and skill, as it does to 
prescribe the most powerful potion or medicine, for medicine 
and exercise as a remedial agent, are alike subject to nature's 
imperative laws, and the indiscriminate use and prescribing 
of all kinds of exercises, often result in more or less injury 
(especially to the weak and nervous), without profit or credit 
to the practioner. 

In formulating Psycho- Physical Exercise it is intended to 
meet the busy practitioner's ever ready want, when exercise 
may be indicated, by furnishing him in ethical form an exercise 
prescription nicely written in script on his own prescription, 
with letterhead name, office hours, address, etc., making it easy 
and convenient to prescribe, and charge for it as well as for 
any other prescription. It will 'be seen from the nature of these 
exercises, that it is not indicated or intended for weak, nervous 
and sedentary patients to take violent and vigorous exercise 
as though they were going in training for athletic sports or 

// ^ A 



— 4 — 

for prize-fighting, but if they will take the exercise according 
to directions, they will get all the 'benefits required, for the 
slow movements will invite the blood to all parts of the system,. 
building up good healthy muscle; also the body movements 
will give massage to the bowels, liver, and kidneys, without; 
shock or injury, and also good gymnastics to the lungs, in- 
creasing from the start lung expansion. And, last but not least,, 
the slow uniform motion whips the nervous and rebellious 
muscular system into absolute co-ordination or control of the 
mind and, after this is done, the practitioner's advice to his 
patient is ready, without fear of injury, to take up any violent 
physical exercise, preparatory to any athletic sports or voca- 
tions. It is hoped the worthy practitioner will kindly examine 
carefully the scientific side of these exercises, for in prescrib- 
ing them he will not only benefit very much his patients but. 
the exercises will be a source of revenue to his own pocket, that 
likely has been practically out of his reach. 

The Author. 



THE SCIENTIFIC TREATISE OF 

THERAPEUTIC EXERCISE. 



In Hare's System of Practical Therapeutics, Dr. Benjamin 
Lee says : "The day when the whole duty of the physician 
"was comprised in the prescribing of pills and potions, and 
when anything 'beyond this was considered infra dignitatem, 
is happily in the past. 

"The scientific practitioner of to-day considers his the whole 
realm of nature wherein to seek for means of curing the 
maladies and relieving the sufferings of those who place them- 
selves under his care. The imponderables, the gases, physics, 
mechanics — all the forces of the universe — are laid under 
contribution to enable him to accomplish his beneficient 
objects. Man is now regarded not simply a combina- 
tion of m3 r sterious vital phenomena or a living laboratory of 
chemical processes and reactions, but also as a machine of 
wondrous complexity, obedient to the laws of mechanics, whose 
several components and constituents are to a great extent gov- 
erned by the same physical forces as control similar elements 
outside of the living body." 

Among the means belonging to this general class of reme- 
dial methods none have attracted more attention within the 
last quarter of a century than Mechanical Therapeutics, and 
this has been well deserved. Dr. Lee says, "Movement or 
motion is a modem philosophy of the initial of every physical 
phenomenon or process." 

Heat, light, electricity, the attractions, are all modes of 
motions, to use the generally adopted phrase. 

"When we come to the consideration of the living animal, 
however, the phenomena and processes which we call vital — 
this difficulty vanishes. In the primordial cell of every liv- 
ing tissue we are able with the aid of the microscope to see the 
motion going on. This cell is the unit and exponent of life, 
both in its origin and perpetuation. We observe the inces- 
sant movement of the contents of the cell, within and through 



— 6 — 

its walls by constant endosmosis and exosmosis. Irregularity 
or retardation of this motion constitutes the condition to which 
we give the name 'disease.' Cessation of endosmose and ex- 
osmose motion is death." 

"Health" is that condition of the individual in which move- 
ments of the cell contents of all the tissues are normally car- 
ried on. It is the function of ordinary muscular movement,, 
such as is used necessarily in the daily avocations of life or 
instinctively used in Obedience to the imperative demands of 
the muscular sense, to maintain the normal movement of the 
cell contents. 

In introducing any practical exercise on an ethical basis, it 
is not presuming to say that it is a long-felt w r ant. It is then 
with the abject of providing the practitioner with a reliable,, 
practical and rational exercise, based on physiology, anatomy, 
and psychology, the last of which has been fearfully overlooked 
in all other exercises that have been presented to the profes- 
sion. The advances made in all branches of medical learn- 
ing during the last few years have rendered therapeutic meas- 
ures increasingly rational and complete, and it is without 
dispute that physical exercise is one of the rational remedial 
agents, but its practical application, on 'account of the com- 
plicated and expensive machines and paraphernalia required 
to give or prescribe the exercises indicated puts it beyond the 
pale of the practitioner. 

We have fully demonstrated that our new Psycho-Physical 
Exercise is rational, practical, and within the easy reach of 
the practitioner. It is practical because it does not require 
an exjDensive outlay of cumbersome machines or other para- 
phernalia. It is practical for the reason that all the prin- 
ciples of physical culture are condensed so that it is not neces- 
sary to wade through large volumes of literature to make out 
and condense a prescription suitable to your patient, for in 
this method you have all the literature setting forth the car- 
dinal principles of not only Mechanical Therapeutics, but it 
shows clearly the all-important factor of the mind co-operat- 
ing in the least and in every movement of all the exercises 
given. It is rational, first because it is in harmony with all 
of nature's simple but imperative laws; second, it finishes out 



— 7 — 



the exercise that your sedentary patient does not get, relieving 
him of the neurasthenic tendencies and conditions that follow 
insufficient exercise, and that without in the least taxing or 
straining the muscles or setting up irritation in the weak, 
flabby tissue, that would necessarily follow in forcejhnuick, 
or violent exercise; third, it is rational because ifJnaHs all K*^t< 
the indications as an ethical therapeutic measure in all condi- 
tions where exercise should be supplemented as a remedial 



In describing the modus operandi of Psycho- Physical Exer- 
cise we will adhere strictly to the laws of physiology and psy- 
chology. We know that the mind and nerve centers are the 
Visaa Tergo of the human economy, not metaphysically, but 
psychologically speaking of the harmonious action of the mind 
both voluntary and automatic, with all the body functions, 
insures health ; the inharmonious action of mind with the 
body functions causes disease or conditions that lead to dis- 
ease. 

Those patients who need physical exercise as a remedial 
agent are usually characterized by insufficient or want of peri- 
pheral circulation with weak flabby tissue, cold extremities, 
attended with clammy perspiration/and if they are of neuras- 
thenic tpye they are apt to have persistent indigestion, neu- 
ralgia, and many other symptoms that could result in numer- 
ous diseases. In restoring the peripheral circulation the weak 
flabby tissues should be abundantly supplied with the primor- 
dial cell which is the unit and exponent of all living tissue. 
These cells can be seen (as it is said) by the aid of the micro- 
scope, in their incessant movement within and through the 
walls by constant endosmosis and exosmosis. 

In prescribing a physical exercise it is evident that the 
main object is to supply the tissue with this cell, the unit of 
life, and to do this without injury or interference in the 
process of endosmosis and exosmosis, the dilators and con- 
strictors in the peripheral circulation must not be filled too 
fast or with undue force. It can be easily seen that in form- 
ulating Psycho-Physical Exercise, however slow in action, yet 
with the advantage of the absolute co-ordination of mind and 
motion the dilators and constrictors can be filled with life-giv- 
ing blood without injury or disturbance of function. 



It may be considered whether the blood will be carried suffi- 
ciently to the periphery by the slow motion as given in these 
exercised directions. By experiment it has been proven that 
by directing the mind to a partially atrophied limb,*3* de- 
cided increased flow of blood to the parts so directed, and the 
atrophied limb restored to the normal size, even without any 
motion whatever. Now, it is evident that a slow uniform 
motion will greatly aid in the directing process, or in other 
words, the slow motion up and down will greatly aid in in- 
ducing the blood to the parts without injuring the delicate 
vessels and the flabby tissue. Then it will be seen that the 
relation of exercise to the heart, and the circulation is a mat- 
ter of most profound importance. In relation to this point 
the fact should be stressed that the heart is not the only force 
involved in the circulation of the blood. It is doubtless the 
great engine of the circulation, but it has been shown clearly 
by Schiff and numerous other physiologists, that the move- 
ment of the blood is greatly aided by the rhythmic action of 
the small vessels, both arterioles and capillaries. Then to aid 
the heart and the peripheral circulation, the thing needed is 
not simply an increased rate of heart activity, or an increased 
volume of the pulse, but an increased movement of the blood 
current throughout the entire system without undue hydro- 
static blood pressure that would result in forced and violent 
exercise. We should look to this all-important part in pre- 
scribing exercise as a remedial agent; that we have not only 
a central heart to stimulate, but we have a delicate peripheral 
heart to protect from serious injury. Two other very im- 
portant factors as remedial agents are included in this sys- 
tem of exercise : First, the deep breathing that is practiced 
before each exercise, the importance of which will not fail to 
attract the attention of the practitioner, for it is a known fact 
that few people actually know how to breathe. 

It will be seen in the exercise directions that a deep breath- 
ing exercise is formulated with not only the view of oxygeniz- 
ing the blood, but also giving superb gymnastics to lun°-s. 
Every practitioner is perfectly conversant with the very nerv- 
ous condition of the patient who needs physical exercise, and 
here we will call attention to this fact: that this very nerv- 



ous condition of the patient is expected to be benefited, not- 
withstanding the weak, flabby condition of the entire muscular 
system, by active, violent and heroic exercise. Every practi- 
tioner, after the second thought, will remember that with such 
patients the least muscular fatigue will increase nervousness. 
This exercise has been formulated with the view to meet all 
the conditions, and the slow uniform movements will un- 
doubtedly effect a perfect co-ordination of muscle, nerve and 
brain action, thereby relieving your nervous patient, adding 
to your income, with gratitude to your name, for it is known 
that in the inability to control irregular muscular movements 
has the tendency to produce nervous prostration, and in giv- 
ing the first arm exercise you will note the jerky movement, of 
the arm when an attempt is made to bring the slow movement 
of the limb under the direct control of the mind and will. 

To recapitulate: Psycho- Physical Exercise is intended to 
overcome the objections to other exercise as a therapeutic 
measure. If practiced persistently according to directions, it 
will invigorate the entire system, build up muscle that will not 
•soften, gives good and desirable lung expansion, preventing 
or relieving incipient tendencies to the much dreaded lung 
diseases. It will build up the nervous system, and, unlike the 
blacksmith, the nerves when educated under muscle, brain 
and will co-ordination, can do as well the most artistic work 
with precision, or swing the heavy hammer with a forceful 
blow. 



EIJLES AXD FACTS IX EEGAED TO PEESCEEBIXG 
PSYCHO-PHYSICAL EXEECISE. 



The complete nine exercises can be prescribed all at the 
same time, but the tenth should not be taken by the patient 
until all the other exercises have been taken at least two weeks. 

The tenth exercise is a dead-still exercise, except the deep 
breathing, which serves as a complete rest and a great tonic 
to not only all the muscles, but also to the nerves as well. 

When your patient seems to rebel before completing any of 



— 10 — 

the exercises, that is the patient that needs it the most, and 
good results will positively follow if the directions are fol- 
lowed. 

It must be remembered that these exercises are formulated 
as a remedial agent, and not intended to train for prize-fight- 
ing nor for athletic sports, but by all means these exercises 
should be taken thoroughly before going into any violent exer- 
cise, for it greatly prevents muscular soreness and heart 
leision. 

Psycho- Physical Exercise is not an experiment. The sys- 
tem has been tested for several years, and will give as good 
results when indicated as medicine when medicine is indicated. 

Will give a few cases successfully treated out of a great 
number by this exercise. 

Case first. — Miss D. had been a victim of insomnia for sev- 
eral weeks from no cause except muscular and nerve ex- 
haustion from excessive involuntary muscular movements- 
which seemed to be uncontrollable by the patient. She took 
the nine exercises for two weeks, then added the tenth exer- 
cise for a week longer, which resulted in a complete relief 
from insomnia. In fact, the patient claimed that she felt 
like she could sleep at any and all times. 

Case second. — Miss V., age twenty-two years, had received 
head injury a year previous to the time I saw her. She had 
well-developed choreic movements, such as twitching of mus- 
cles of face and mouth, involuntary throwing out of hands 
and feet, attended with general debility, indigestion. Three 
weeks' treatment with Psycho-Physical Exercise relieved all 
of the involuntary movements of muscles of the hand and feet,, 
gained in weight, and much improved in every way. 

Case third. — A young man had incipient writers-cramp- 
from excessive typewriting. I gave him all the exercise, but 
paid esnecial attention to arm exercise, and in one month he 
was entirely relieved of a well-marked case of writers-cramp 
in the incipient stage. 

Case fourth. — A doctor^ age seventy-six, ihad excessive trem- 
ulousness of muscles of forearm like paralyses agitants. attend- 
ed with genera] weakness, walked with unsteady gait, leaning 



— 11 — 

to the right as he walked in a falling, tottering way. When 
commenced taking exercise could not elevate right hand half 
to a level with shoulder. After taking the exercise two weeks 
could easily elevate both hands on a level with shoulders, and 
walked much better with not so much bending to the right, 
and with more confidence, etc. 

This is only to show the large scope of patients that this 
exercise can and will relieve without doing any harm, which 
is more than can be said in administering medicines. 



— 12 

J. McFADDEN GASTON, M.D., 

Ex-President of the American Academy of Medicine; Ex-President of 

the Southern Surgical and Gynecological Society ; Chairman of 

the Surgical Section of the American Medical Association, 

writes as follows : 

No. 228 PRUDENTrAL Bldg., 

Dr. W. B. Parks, Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 15th, 1902. 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Dear Doctor: 

I have read with great pleasure your paper on Psycho-Phys- 
ical exercise for Neurotic troubles, and take pleasure in indorsing 
the correctness of your views of the applicability of this method 
to a large class of diseases. 

I have availed myself personally of the instruction given by 
you as to the mode of proceeding with the exercise, and find it 
well suited to restore the tone and vigor of paretic limbs in which 
tremors have been progressive for two years prior to adopting 
your exercise. 

The scientific treatment of such conditions commends itself 
to the medical profession, and physicians should be consulted by 
those suffering from insomnia, neurasthenia, and allied nervous 
disorders attended with tremulousness of the limbs and the head. 

The correlation of the nerves and capillaries gives harmony 
to the functions of all parts of the body, and when interrupted 
from any cause leads to impairment of the trophic nerves. I seek 
to correct such troubles by mechanical means when possible, and 
by superficial measures with exercise. 

The vasomotor nerves are tributary to the performance of 
the vital functions without reference to the voluntary acts of the 
individual, and yet the co-ordination of the peripheral and central 
parts call for uniformity of action in the Psycho-Physical result. 
The attention of the subject who undergoes the exercise is of 
importance in deriving the benefits of its general application, as 
well as in its local effects. 

The claim of Psycho-Physical exercise is to utilize body and 
mind, and the uniform action and re-action of the motor or 
voluntary system and the organic or sympathetic nerves is an 
important result of this exercise. 

It will be understood that this process need not interfere with 
the use of other means of medicinal treatment. 

Very respectfully, 

J. McFADDEN GASTON, M.D. 



— 13 — 



DR. J. C. AVERY, 

Member of the American Medical Association, Georgia State Association, 
and Atlanta Society of Medicine, writes as follows : 

Dr. W. B. Parks, 

Atlanta, Ga. 

My Dear Doctor : 

It is with great pleasure that I have examined your work on 
Psvcho-Physical Exercise, and I fully believe, with more profit 
than I have received from any book of like size, character and 
purpose that has come to my attention in a period of a quarter of 
a century of a world of busy book-building and reading on my part. 
In many ways has it commended itself to my approval, and will, 
I believe, so commend itself to every thoughtful physician who is 
honestly seeking the expression of many fundamental laws, and 
the best ready method of their application in the ' healing art." 
Its convincing, forceful simplicity, with its comprehensive sug- 
gestiveness, is by no means its smallest point of value, though 
great enough is this characteristic to put it beyond a money 
valuation. ,. . -.j^,, 

I will not more than touch upon a point or two which I think 
justifies me in the opinion I hold. As you and all other physi- 
cians in this part of the world well know, in the course of a girl s 
attendance at our public schools she is required to go through a 
so-called system of physical culture, and without regard to her 
special condition, the state of her health, or the amount or char- 
acter of exercise she may, of necessity, have to perform away from 
school. She must go through i his Physical Culture at school 
on the penalty of a disheartening low mark. With what grada- 
tion of exercise, or what variation on account of age, develop- 
ment or lack of development, or her condition as with reference 
to fatigue at the regulation hour, she still must get her share of 
"culture." As to the rationale of the system as applied in our 
city, I can perhaps best comment by reciting the fact that this 
very day I was called upon by a patron of our schools to examine 
and advise with regard to the propriety of having a. daughter 
take physical culture during the coming session. I advised that 
she should not, most positively. A sister of this child, two years 
ago, had to be taken from school on account of a physical and 
nervous breaking down. Chorea, the effect of too heroic culture 
at an unpropitious time, being a prominent sign of her need for a 
change and rest. She was receiving the " culture daily with a 
large class, probably fifty in her room, when the change and rest 
became necessary. Two years have passed and she still shows th& 
effect of too heroic culture. Another, and several (not to say 
many) other similar cases have come under my observation, all 
having finally to receive less " culture " and more rest before an 
improvement could be observed. All of these, in my opinion, 



— 14 — 

instead of being injured by physical culture would have been 
benefited by your system of Psycho-Physical exercise. 

Another class of patients cause me to feel indebted to you for 
your work in this system. As you are aware, my practice has long 
been in the fields of Gynecology and Surgery, and while we have 
books— many books — and journals galore on almost every branch 
and phase of this department of practice, I know of no volume 
that so clearly sets forth the things — the help I need and want, as 
you present it in your physical exercise. My ambition has, for 
several years, been to cure the diseased pelvic female organs 
without an operation (at least, without the extirpation of them), 
just as it once was with the older, and now is with the younger 
men of the profession, to count by series of a hundred the sacrificed 
ovaries of their hoping and dependent patients, and much thought 
have I given to this subject, and much reading have I done, to say 
nothing of my own effort put forth ; and truly do I believe that I 
now have from you my best help in the guide to orderly, 
systematic exercise of these various organs — which is to say, that 
now I can positively control the circulation, the nourishment, the 
resolution or absorption of inflammatory products, the appropri- 
ate and needful physiological rest. Doctor, but for the fact that 
I know there is a limit to your powers of endurance, I would tell 
you that pain-relieving and sleep-producing portions will have to 
take a back seat if the doctors once learn the inestimable value of 
the intelligent use of your Physical Culture system in this 
direction. 

For myself, and I believe I could safely do so for the whole 
profession the world over, I extend to you my grateful thanks for 
having so thoroughly and satisfactorily supplied me with just what 
I want and have wanted for many years— a guide and a light in 
the dark. JAMES C. AVERY, 

Atlanta, Ga. 



J. S. TODD, M.D. 

Ex-Secretary American Medical Association ; Ex-President Georgia State 
Medical Association ; First Assistant General Surgeon U. C. V. ; 
Professor Materia Medica, College Physi- 
cians and Surgeons, Atlanta, Ga., 
writes as follows: 

Dr. Parks : 

Always appreciating the effects of mind over matter, and 
knowing that proper exercise is often better than drugs, I con- 
gratulate you on the formula you have gotten up for Psycho- 
Physical exercises, indorse the same, and hope you success. 

J. S. TODD. 



— 15 — 

GEORGE H. NOBLE, M.D., 

Fellow of the American Gynecological Association ; Fellow of t ae Ameri- 
can Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists ; Fellow of the 
Southern Surgical and Gynecological Association ; Ex-Secretary 
Section on Obstetrics of the American Medical Association; 
Ex-President of the Medical Association of Georgia; 
Ex-President of the Atlanta Society of Medicine, and 
Gynecologist of Grady Hospital, Atlanta, Ga., 
writes as follows : 

In neurasthenic subjects and convalescent patients with soft 
and flabby muscles Dr. Parks's system of exercise is a very useful 
agent. It is a carefully graduated exercise supplanting massage 
in cases just getting on their feet, and is a helpful means of giv- 
ing strength, hardening muscles and stimulating various emunc- 
tories. It is devoid of the risk of violence so common in many 
forms of exercise. Delicate children and women may use it with 
perfect confidence. GEO. H. NOBLE, M.D. 

Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 9, 1902. 



R. R. KIME, M.D., 

Ex-President Tri-State, Alabama, Georgia and Tennessee, Medical Society ; 

Ex-President Georgia Medical Association ; Ex-President Atlanta 

Society of Medicine ; Member Southern Surgical and 

Gynecological Society, writes as follows: 

W. B. Parks, M.D., 

Atlanta, Ga. 
Dear Doctor: 

I have read your manuscript on Psycho-Physical Exercise 
with interest and pleasure. 

Physical exercise has not held that place in the treatment and 
prevention of disease that its importance demands. We commend 
your effort to put physical exercise on a rational scientific ethical 
basis. 

It is not only of importance to the physician as a therapeutical 
measure, but of immense value in the development of the race. 

We are glad you have originated a system of exercise that can 
be practiced by all classes without injury to any. It not only 
develops the physical but exercises the mental at the same time, 
which in many cases is of immense value in relieving nervous 
symptoms and in giving the mind control over the body. 
Yours respectfully, 

K. R. KIME, M.D. 



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319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



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yU^w/lr {sd*L<i) /£cls7L& /Pk^c*i*£ Jl^^-^v. 
IUs<Use> TO^fcu/ Jrr^i /U^sutsb Ifasist 

•*-Z^V yfcvLe sCtrCGs s&ZstS CbtsUoC fftOu 



M. D. 

(9) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/uxdUtyode /JMewAe oJ£Jyi^^ Ms 
maMl/£o PtJpoA ^i^^Jy Q^MrdUcs./aJt. 

7 I j ■ /f ;J/^J# 

Ar&f Jfa&ttsty felt a>o<i^CctAy^i olivet a>£z4 
^■riJ £t gut. v&tw ,44nsi<? £f#i>t, Q&sisoAcsu&i 

oditrtjiw fori $£ .£adb*sC- ZmasCoI c&t A£'as2Sl 



1*&ylr* 



M.D. 



(10) 



Name. 



Diagnosis 



Result 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



T^CTsUZSi/C? /L0T2sCtS Cist /utzsi &CO£Ms ?yvffl.- 

jHmyi-^- G^UrL>c/y £cu/(U- c^/zU^J /U-i^. 
£ve>Gts£*u stasis: /Q^U<n&c6zf y€^>z^u ^TtJutJt 



?KWPI/ JkZs&H' (>^2^v Jie^^i^US yi&<Ccvy.-. 
&pt far s&tsy*v£ ) trsAtstsi- u€^fy />C<rvyCy 

7-JtU<if -J&sx /dAc- cur**** i&yt&Ouz^j? ct4~ 

/£$£, £,-lAfWl^ /Usui "hyiyt^e^ /it^fo/Q/ /6trUu 
Cyhuos /££& &r£ yvi £cd>K, /O^aJoI&v 

Cut ^t^totoU/r- yiruuut •jHfi*^' /U^vz£o. /yrtct 
ju, Zvy£-curK*' CuZ ^ut^^- «tw Usi&iZ*?, /i^rta><l 

M. D, 

(1) 



DR. WM, PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Z^PVt*/ fsOZsK dt^O Jb-e -Ct/lslWO /ZJU <(TL 

fc&lA&f^ ^JLvhbrch A%-&4st' &uryi--Us *&*>&>■ v&r» 

M. D. 

(2) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



.S^^ve^oho ■ /tirvv' ?yi/lAv c^tp^i^ fi&r-de 

/ £?JUs2Sl4sisL<<£ A%4 CtsrW^l Cot A/tLb .^Xii 
WsCisvU&J Ct/l& sCUsesl TvlJai, /wit flJLn<OC- 







M.D. 

(3) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



sunrzeJ!<s cut ^mx &u?L^ % ZcJ/a. /i$u 







M. D. 

(4) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



„ op •/' „ / a* i 



M*wrvts -faying /fflle Jrtndcf Z-a^fb J^ 



djLti 



M.B. 



(5) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



JK/ 7/Oy/tLb {Wis M^&C jhrU&ruts 

fry CulCcn^JU^q / rf%it Z%-c&s £> Z4M&C 
iru^frrtxvvchz, TrtsfrU' u&aJx Co&U> 

/u>t£Z4, TMsusd; zU asi&n^k&t & 
uOuisOC jirrvret/r&t stasis crrctt^s /Ci 

(X4> iaslrts&0<><-£ "yHyC^i^t^T lfstsC*z6c<-£ 

AiA/t&sL«si^ 7-&£si^/ ftsCtns*& 2 f /louche. 



. M. D. 

(6) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



tstrt&rtsvi*? A4tAsru/ /z&o&vtcCe /H/st-isS-eft 



/loqJi/l /Ou^ur ccCun^M^^ /One. fenX*/ Xh 
/riLeM^Us frtuiJti^cvr-cc aa <£&£ /CtU^oo-/L 
t&iszzshot 'coo -Sour coo jLtn^uM TyMvui 

yt^otn^v /U^u fi£>£Jz*4&>, &M&r 7r*Ue>& cn£t 

07<r JPfiU, Z-ZT&U/ OAAjU s&WtJ- /U Ct/Ld60t44t 

rrdocuvoC t%zt<s Jhzsi*^"?- prrnx^roU/ 
&14A. /n^CsOooct\<l<42 cu&d th&Ct&l^isi^?- , 



M. D. 

(7) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/*> AVtct^i^ol jLru/yi, a>rtfri4 A£&ty 

/l>ir£l \s*r /TJ-ias&f sfctlz -H&ctsct film-. 
.£<U /nrMy fflu, /CcM~ /I4^ytn4>u?uyu i 

T^vm-C- sidie^o' •jhrisisi' -yujx&C A^rvco- 

^utrt^is? Cist ygi^L£- /fasz^LsZ , >u> st*i> 



.ID. 

(8) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/%. Jx&c?axsv 7*u££ s&Lc <?&z£j£ &*£ag 

/OtTOi, push frtJU^ul. a CJrP2*4M in ^cts/& 
lUy^c^ 77-z^z^ 2-W^ /U^sKtsh "fctsf; 

stsi^Kif yfiplt sLirOZs stasis Cbty^oC 0ZXsU 



__ M. D. 

(9) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/L&lA Wis fi&t yuM /UL&d> CW^7yv£&> 

rvoMkdi JMtnM cdU^ Ms 



QAJscuh/ sVH/ Cuw 



M.B. 



(10) 



Name . 



Diagnosis . 



Result 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



J^lmyi^i- £^rL&&C /U^<ft£- CZ<&^A£ 4^s;J>- 




&4f*tda) ZrCs- 

J-faUfr "fife* s&Ac OsrZW Ir&^VOU^t^ ct4~ 
/Pn£, .Z'lArffT^' /foul ~£tsi^jr>e^ /Ci^o/Q, /ttru,^ 
(ykesi/ dsPUs /Uri ytd £cJldv /oJi*iL^Dt£si/ 

i&Jdesx) flew /v<i-£eis£e J>&£. prtltrZi Chsrwu 



M. D. 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 











M.D, 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 






' /L&4£zs/~&d> ^te^ytxyCi,. yC^t^^i^v 1, 







M.D. 



(3; 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Q^pydi^y ^pCt/lsi sty /&U itvoU^ firr-- 






Q/Fik^ T^U^i/t &>COltsG> yC<nr24st</ ytesu JyTHA? 



■ft/ IfrCl/lsU sTji vJzL& fordtf si£&C 
'"WsO TMsClAst ~fcCislsL>1? slw-liJz<, yi^u for, 

ZMTTs'V /T^CUyQA, * spitz- &Crc£c/ ltd JzLt 1AJ&£ 
/pi T^lyOtyQ^CiytZ^, fat /Ui^O lrt)iyUsC<Q/ 



M. D. 

(4) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



l^yuq &GL^sl£, yUsMsOs&ft, /fid. 







.M,D. 



(5) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



yt^i^dks {U&in^oU/ jhrr s&U, died 
't&^tmxxsiclt ?ru£u, A&ctSi &£<U) 

is&UVCC, •IvrWZZ:'>T?£ sifts 0TCC(/ls ,£> 
Cis& ia^VZsiU^Ce. ^HsUU^^U^C ifyts(sc6c^_^ 



M.D. 

(6) 



V 



. y- * v s 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Mv sclsjiU, oaa J>rC&h 'PtnAytunyt/ tey&i 

£s{rZ4yr-lstst><> /lAtA^U/ /QJLeATlAoU /H/^-^J^J^ 



/trZris&cA yCo oAiA^oJ'/trr uzA-uJ A^u /rrctesu 
■ /to flyiu^cUf JazZ. £irvU/ Wi- aaU J^J^ 

/UAtJlA /Ol^vls&r Ct-CUrtMAAx? AAt£ ^irv£</ A4 
/piyi&Cts&zjl' £tz&/t<i^ci^~cC! &A £k4. / Cc&t4s£-A* 
^£c^ctyU<^ Coo -jhvr a* ~ptnAU^<k TnAAL-sict 
<Lui*sc6tst4- GAT-Pist*^. J/Cous<U A4*s AfrtA frtrj- 

^0~ AAtZ Z-lr&Lu OAsud. JU^stsd- Ad CtAlAUAte*. 
ZAU QA&irtsU?£i^t*? 'lLirX4S0t*Tsv> k ?HA&l-#ttA 
ZirtAAAfsist^O Afc£ "J-istrtrr T^tAAu /Vi^^A, f^vf 
<ZAsisis£Lst AAist* /OuisuiAr A<3 &a/r>ij&c£ irnJSA&vytAs- 

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to OAlAsUsWU /IaLl PlAZACO^-OA, J^-CA!A " 
~h4rOAAkliri^u J 'HA / ^T^ AAW4A- A& Ao 
&€■ Q>CVrn£<o[. ^A^lrVOOA^ AAtA fi>&A&U Js%£^, 



—M.D. 

(7) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/& dsCcoz^ol JtAMyt, asriau} At^ow 

ttiJfcsu^ ytcJ^t^q- /wit ■A^cvd 
£u mrtAy ,£*u, /CtM" /XWrtxJoUsl/, 

tmt ir&ucy/i outxd AsUww lO^A^rc^c^yi^ 
7Msirrt> stdLz*^" ■jhtAAs -yu^coot A*rfci>- 



(8) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/%. J.Z&cfriXsis Tfrufii j!#Lc cs£&£j£ ' Zs>&Cb; 

sit/ cpns<x^^xs&s tij^jsrisL^isu? £&t 

/Cist^lslr CSLS&L4 /VCZs/tU, ^y^CyOyt Xs)C&lr. 
(UsiUse, y) r tyt>UU JrirfrzL Xuisisish frlstsfc 

/t-<^t<£ /PtLc stirCsVs sl&ZS Gbtsuoi 0UsC 



. . M. D. 

(9) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 









am4 wis wit J!e^ jZJU&A ay^c{7yt^o 
fltattticU JM/nM cd&*Liy Ms 

„ ml a, s&*0c TvtdJo Jde &4&v aW^ 
Jh^^t-vy feist d>o<i&w /t £ ccLt^d a>^s 

cJuri^ud 'fort $£ .faxsKestst- U4A&6 c&t a£-coqs£ 



M.D. 



(10) 



Name. 



Diagnosis . 



Result 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



J J/ J/UZszsud JsrtOT Ki^Jt' a^r^^^ ^ /Ct - 
WUruidMs (djrLld £cis/uL OrO&^J M^iJ- 

jyjL& Tsi-Vcdtfu WhsLsCf' Qs£rUs2st&'2st<? ^^j, 

Ptt^Ur &Z&& 0^244, JLe^r^e^v y^&vy- 
ju£ / or Jszsi<vi<h ) &&cp*si>4' b&te/ ' /O^urz^/ 

eJu>su ddtf Ari yd. M*J^ .aJuruJ!pl&v', 

Cist /fiAcUsUZ&T pWuiyt j&fl*^- /Ct&vtZo. /^rtc<. 

f f 

M. D. 

(1) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 




j. f s — P- t J> 



.31. D. 




DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/K/. ,JA&sl^/(?l £sr&Csp' ~?-rt^ti 74WU/Z&/ 

A. g^-k*^LMs&>_ " /Z%j>s oim^ 

PtU/ICaAa' ■ /liryy Pri/Wv 'anywise, 

l^n^yt/Lo TiriAsA/ yCt^^ce^ /iyffCciytJ> ^--C^-n^y 

jA^tyu JstryhCsu aXwr-JU/ /C6 /£&£ (Hole. 

. . M. D. 

(3) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



yCfftrze^y cut s$u /2yioie^ i ^ctMt /&L 
curses iia/iso sd l/J&£ Zvvb/ s&Le, 

f ' J-J" P tf J L 

Q/nilAs0 HtsUAjs ?4sGL4sL<t? /C<n^U-U/ sitsts JytftA 

J/ J ^J . f P /> v J» h • 
cod/ sCtu irrcu/ /ua /iZiryh&j i^AycCp^vq 

T^tryy /u^i^it "sfizLts t^6c/ lid ,£&£ 



_M D. 

(4) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



" ^ * fi J. D 



M.D. 



(5) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



TstMwfavcvu£4 ?Ks&>i jLe&J% aX<u> 

(X4 i&4rt*^C<rlU' 7 / ><^i^t^C' Uslstsc6c4_£ 
<oAh^VcAsLsls- 7-Azst^S ftsOcnsl^if A<*>LAU. 



M. D. 

(6) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



a^ruyn^ /Usi*£/ al^nM JkJ^Xeft 
jt&ssrzAct 'a* far CM j^uMnO&^i 

to-<MAUA*U /tit J^cJuyrcJ X^t 

M . D. 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



ds£ci<z*>c>6 jtAMyl, asna>t4 &&<><?&■ 

ZU mcC/U /pvio /Ctft /^hdrUyCcUyU i 
tdu, &tts(y/t Ctyut^ /Vo<^Av /Os&sirus£c&s>- 

Tn^tn-C' /C*t£sist^ "jHrutsu "yi^a^i Asrzkx-- 



M.D. 

(8) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/%. Ji^v^y vrt4%£. yl?*li 6&&&J &>£Cfr 



A*sUlsu4r. c^t^O /icis/tU; /fivtcrtst JtnUn-_ 
(UAUstl, -ytfsdA' T^rfctL sltsi^stsh Z^fc 



M. D. 

(9) 



DR. WM, PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 






"hcb^GC^&puAAfO^a^-. 



n&aJL^ /Q^oU/cy JzU.twU /Ut^L^/^ 

/Ju /i^aSt '/^J^ jL^-ILe^- csow^/teM /£& 
f2A J ajUbu& /dj&ut-nA* al£Jy^<^ M-e 

y AtjUJkchjZa (dex^U/ sin* Cxsvv 

ff&jbt /n&a, Jxdt TyiM Me MO* *^ 
idLip jh we*. tt£ ifa* JJ*J^*Hilu 



t*St*i< 



.31. D. 



(10) 



Name 



Diagnosis . 



Result 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 






ZMA&i £6U>£ Qsrzzt, iie^i4>&^ yi£?Ccvy.~ 
&ot f or Jszsi^id '} Z^A^^z- Cr&rzf {>6rt<r&/ 

edt&tv /64t& /Uri svi ^cJlyfi /O^rt^CcZ^u 

Cist 4&uxt>t£cu!/r j/trtstsL>% ' •jUtu/r /tisi4<t&o. /yrfcx 
JO, jfv~rt-Q/r2&t> ct% JMLArrta- zfiruA- fost^A^ytrftcbZi 

ayrtvM £r€^ P^U^yU/ /to /pple, /(Uc£&&. 

M. D. 

(1.) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 




£t^K£s<2/ JsUjC s£&6 3-vT-Z-Ct/l4^sUO Alj&4 4FL. 

/ftOAA&sV iS-fllvKLrch js&£^<> &4*ry>t<s s&ryy&h v&? 
Ouster) cU&vn^tg fa QZezrCy fe*^^K<z-£^ 



_,¥. D. 

(2) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



p%£s^&tAxs /itryy Trt/tvL' Czsrfi*^' 'jk&T-ft- 

A&texs/^A&l ^sLC<sOu£L_ sfflz*£sisists 



l^rist^Lo yirisui' yfo&vt^ A*rt<Zst> /Ayi^y- 



M.D. 

(3) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



j€*pz£>£u arf ymi /did^;, J?cJ/a Mie 

MU zdutUA/ ^0/l4 yd AfJL, Throbs jhr- 

Ct/nkise vu*su£ zlcutstso J^uJ&s si**/ find 






M. D. 

(4) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



„0P ■& „ P # * i 







-M.D. 



(5) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



trz^JivKXAeU T^l&L &&c*Jk Osl<U) 

(X& iLtrts&CsZrXU. TWJC&L^rt*^' t£AsO<£o<_4 



: m.d. 

(6) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



£*rV&rUUK<? y^it^U/ a£&tri4oU /kyf.^-U/CeM 
M fiA£ou£w JfaZ. ZrtrvU/ Wis /SJU J-&&& 

M£estsciA£c£ as) -four Cto 'pirUl^o<k TUs&L-eui 
07O~ JsU& Z~irdxj dyt^d JitststsUi' /U Ct/UUtslACt 

~h^r0^tytt^riyu J-tLt s^Tt AslWlstr A4> /to 

M. V. 

(7) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/>> sULcvisuot, jlJVUst, CUrWVC At&ict- 

Jiu /nHA/ /fitu, /CcJt /WMrucJeusu i 
Twm-6 /6tt<est^ •jhnstsi' -yiytoyoc A^ifco- 



M.D. 

(8) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/%. JitbOptHsV l*u££ J5*Lc <s&£4j£ &t£ag 

Z2o~tL trust &CUsfcl 0- £4&2*£0! t rduJ& 

aJyUtz^tytyvq sfipu, jlrrf /&> -c&z&UAMi 

SsU, 24AX^LyTCtyC ^IKU^lsrZ^ 

/Usl^lstr (scs&lso /£&/&& /^yyO^ &TU^_ 
lUseslsa, -nts^/is ~forfc4, /£utsisfh t ~&<st 

yi^^w yfitle sLv-CO. ^WW COtyuod ffto£ 



. M. D. 

(9) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



ruxMkdt JM/tJU cdiJ^ M* 
iScdll jxX*£ A^v ^4^ 

pile, /i»L^Wu<W < JwLZt, GLtrt'tA&ffi** 



M.I). 



(10) 



Name . 



Diagnosis . 



Result 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 






J-/ * / LP J J/ f> 

Phl/iuH' J&Ui^t' C*sn44s ~k^t^Us<l^1><S yte^Cc^y.^ 
/-&£{& ^l« /fiAc U^yt, ^e^voOi^-^Q ct>U~ 

PacJis 7yrl<yl jHrUsr /lui^Lt^. J-?Lesl4- s£trv>&?- 

W. D, 

(1) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



ZtslrtsUsd/ fdipC &L4 jU^-e -Oc/l4sl&> /<-j&<} SO- 



,. fflLtstst- &Ury>US ,£#?>>&)- stc 

M. D. 

(2) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Jtf. di&tsl^&C jCst-ZC^/ 'T-rt^tl/ JOWUs&k/ 

■ /%r»- trisfcU' Osrw*^ ~ib&rfc 
■^ A&t&ST^**' ^t^yiyOiyCt, s^Lesi^s 

~H>OtslstAd<! Ct/Lt sCiAs&t TvtWt, /wit flJLrf>c£- 








M.D. 

(3) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



ouj, s&U sirtZieslU Ay^tc-t&c. JUvy/ftu 

fflt£ fyshjltsV ^CtA^D yd! JyVu. Z-Vcl<S jb-r-- 

*ru*U 'JLs ^yu cm, id£z coo, yi^b t\yuq_ 

7-yisCflUrvcsfc <Um42U*^US &&€teyiyly>ylyZyZ? 
QynkiyO 7>U<Ct4yt H&ststsO ylfftr^jj^ ytstyv fryuyfc 

cob sZta T^rcuS /L4 /iJstri^&j zkvi 
2wr /IscUsU. "sMu- Arch/ ltd ,£JLt 

/ZsC&n^yLyiyTyQ /(o ch/M / &44^'^l/ ylst^s 



M. D. 

(4) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 






Asty 



/074s 







&>e- 



-M.D. 



(5) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Cl*s<L*> /!Msfo*4A£. ~&*ru?£ Styled J^e. - 

in/ CoC&r2^l>u<4£ softie, Zrtrcdi/ -Z^> %!&te<c{ 
LrCX^WrtVlC&e 7vu2//i UZGlsfy COULO 

•jtaMA^sutg -Thinks J>&£ S^rctt/ J&L& 

"(struct •ir>^yy^t- /y d si^v trTCUAs ,€<> 
/Ctfi static ZrCls&K Zr-ttsUXe- OL& jH^y^ 



. —M.D. 

(6) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



tsirt&ruui*? y^HA^U/ O^CaTHoU JHa^/QM 

/U /^UoL-cLj Jfoz £wU/ #vts ySiLe. J^dUf 

2Ji/U/UA^AAr C&uvWAAA^c? AAt£ lrir$C</ yCo 

££esvzzsl£ct CtA) -jhur OAJ J>ArtAlL&<& 7ru1sU,-rKt 
<Uaaso£oc& aJfrctst*^-. vjcuyoa^, a^a- a?U4 &tn- 

mr JaL^, Zrzr&Lc/ czasc^ Jstsi^isfr Ai> &aauc44*£. 

ZAi£ a£c*sisu?UstA<? -jLvTAAAA-i^, ?~nAA>t,-auA7 
itAyOOAiAAA^ A%£ VlAArtrr TytAAi/ AA^-^A flrtri 
QsiAAsUsi yd&io /Uwi<{r aa bct/m£e£ ' VTX&f&vy**,- 
crcto <2AA<ct LArchy J^ci^iaaaa^- prrytXZsrchz/, 
StAAAPl. 4AL64A, VciAAArtsr JaAAAs£ GtAvct ' Zrtrt^A 
to OAL/LUAAAd /[Att 7AiX<£uA-aAl, /a^CA, 
IL^AACtArtA/ J-^Lc A-caM? /tWw/^ /Lo 

2& &CVmjboL £fa^rt^aJL AA>Lt &OAAU ^CSA, 
Q4AA. A^^A^ch^A^ PUL&A, l^OAitvrtAAA?- % 

M.V. 

(V) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/& yJytctyuooC JtAMyt, CUrtVW AL40&- 

Z>U4<jr /uyiyly fi^C<n4<X^. fLp&o /£&£ 
Zs7-eJzc>£H, yCt^ts /a£C4-2*scC& ■ JyXyW&yU 

Oykyt^yly /U^f Jbu y&Lo Qy^U^z^Qy^d 
/Urll sPr /zJ^iayiff J>$U, £&OtXX, .film* 

£U OLrtA/ J™* /CcM' Zl^tyVlyOCOUyU l 
$U, frVUC^t Otrtxet "A*®&* /3y£strOlJc&y>' 
QMsufoi -Ae-cayci. •Hx*yO< 70^CU>U. QyPnsLyf 
■fivTytyV A^Uxy£tytrTyiy<7. /L&trOr fclyftt, 
74MTC JJLeytyiy jhrutAy yT^Ouol AytrUZ,- 
/i^rt^yy Ctyf yT^i^ £tyt*yt^ , Jrv> yt^-n 
PUtsOeyti, .ik^y^ytyiyt^Q- /fflu, pL&OyOC 
■(tlTtyy /tyPU. /QyuutAy^Cc^eyty^ ct>C" <>n<4 



/fat^i^. s?z& CyCU^U, „c£toyviytA&'. 



M. D. 

(8) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



7% J.iu&istst> i>*u££ s&L, eCe^J j&hAa? 
M^iy<^t^t^ sot a^cul^I^cC- J$usisu 

Ast<iw4r c^t^o /teenies ^^yo^e, ji^u^_ 

lUAUsU- 7^t^>Ay -farfizl /ii^wh "Atst 
M-e-AszzAjg. -bz^csftsz^ct/^edse*' /Cootie - 

st^i^if sUZLc jCo-C&- sterts C&uuoC ffi*s£ 



M. D. 

(9) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



s£JL /i4^z^ /Pistdkyc Ji^&e^ wM^/tew Jtu 
ft/^ai^^odi /dMeiwbe cMrhw*? M-e 

pill, /l^L^hyi^vo^ui^!^' J}-yUsU, GtMWsUfMui, 

dMd -rtfa, A*A '?yt%A 9 >,M&£L4e* ^ 

o$u-&r M^&uJay -jt&ot c&oq&ma£. cxU^d coccus 



,KD. 



(10) 



Name 



Diagnosis. 



Result 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



J J/ J^UZsi-is&l JsrCC/l. 1-H./&L- asrV7'W %**> 
JH^rt^^A- zJ^rL&c/s ^Cou/ie. C^GLZzJ /t^-W-fi- 




?H<£vL J^oc^ a^T^t' ^J^riU^Cu^ yte^Cc^y.- 
ijiuts f&x /&&*> cuyw -^z^di^u^ ajr 

qJi&<V dJte, yiri yd- /^J>U frJLriAJcx&V 
(ksldz/K) y Apt? /l^Ctyte yCfit jrUirtk Qyy^^o- 

/AcJis Trrtsd /****" M*^ 1 -*- J-?i£&t' Astr-20&>~ 



M. D. 

(1) 




DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



J^iJt^yUU^v<}>- 'Assists i^yT-CC^ ?>4tXsl^S ^2-2/ Ct 

/U^-isUsd/ fJjLpc &i{- £rrt -a/l4*suo /£-j&4 4TL. 

_M D. 

(2) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/U. (Un^AsJd^U ' /&&*/ oim^ Zrrte 




a<ZU*^C>. JZisx. /WU, jHr>4- 

£t4st^£S> stasis ,/fi^z<y&^C . 

J Assist, Js<r2s7&U Msrtf-A*/ & yWU <UoU 




M.B. 

(3) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 




-fcwZJU? Asia/Lot Ctsvucf /Z&rvr&S /KKtc&ite 
rrwisoC 'cL& jbsis cm, ^-Aa cue, ;&£& yi ^- 

Q/nku? T^txAA^t ~fccwu<? 



M. 1). 

(4) 




DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Qa yin^r/ ~h-n^u^u__ j^uA^oa^o pct^o. 



Jw, 7/CUJte. /£&.& OCoiaa£ -h^T^tvinyU' 

/isQ>£ • jLtrUdsL^U?' /tie, : vr&o^i^ a^t^t 
^Af JiyCJ^U}y(^& -fas j2/COs<t*sC>U*^ y)si£A, 






tiZwrLtf zrm4& fait jrirvltf frtzs(l</t, A% 



M.B. 



(5) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



ixZs^frAXXSlscta TWsfrH/ TL&CI& OsC<U) 

U&UlA>t ~IirrVrct/>T?£ /WIS trTCCts!/ /Cc 

COQ. MTJyS^ytrCe. TM^U^U^t U*s(sc6o<C£ 
l uXtt : lSlS<^-' /-Assists fislUrZ^C<2f /ICIAsZ>L 

fcfLo Z?<ro6t/ /U agists y £^t^C^U lbriA^Curi* 



M. D. 

(6) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Cxrt^yrui^O /L4t&rUv aJL£strM>o£<Z JH/.^J^M 
/to /X^ouctc/ A4t2, ZrirvU/ #vt- /cJLe. J-eJ!^ 

££usc*sU<tf a^ -far cw jt4r2^uo<k ThJEcIvuX 
PIT- st^Lt frtrctc/ aststCL Jsisisi^fr A6 ClA/U&4<t4£. 

<rvU tx^uc^ lUtjU/ J*&c*^isui^i<<? jhrryyx&rc£<2/. 

to Cl/lAOOl^U /UVU >MX£Us?-GLsl J^&£SC~ " 
'h^^/Ctstrtsv J -pit, /&& /Cz^^v£ A4> Ai> 

M. J). 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



^ &but*U ji^u^t, asnat* Al4g& 

.la __^s Mo AMr aJvvisgI^, 

fan^ Cut ssvU- sfot*^*., jHrr d*~t> 



M.D. 

(8) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 







/Caster tSS&L^) /VCtSlLc &^C<l£. je^)U^-_ 
lUsiUsU- TJr^L^u irtrfrZls /&Ulsisist<r ~$L<ist 

/tst^l<£ /PhZ ylkr-CGs sZ4stS CMsuoC 0Us£ 



Jl.D. 



(9) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 






~hOA<Vot stfWSlst^s&fc^lMA'typl'' 






{ux^bodi /JM£~hA£ cMrUu^a JdLe 
WaMlsio PxJlctJt ^&uJy OA&nJU&.^cJL 

7 J j- /f 7sj% A j ^A/J' 

J p • J- ~ AA ff~ 

, Mil a, yiiv&l ^tUw* swU 2*U&4 ^<nr 

oJhaJa test vz f<aJtt*sC &mM<6 e&t Jka^t 




M.D. 



(10) 



Name. 



Diagnosis . 



Result 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Jth J/fct^tstt JL&C&n rxsZfo, CtT^-m- && 

Pkldvi X6U>& Cv*24-l> ~JL&^U&£u/ yi-&U?vy.-. 
Mil f or- yC^i^tp ) zUdxsz^ o£>?z/ /O^n^Y 



M. D. 

(1) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 






£f^p^&>4/ %6i?c /C^c- Jb-e -&A4A4A /<^y<} /Ol. 
fcauul£>h l^c^Li^tLrO^ /Lfa&tst, {Ifarydty /i4n^€s>- /C<> 



M. D. 

(2) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 






'fiU, 






sl&lOiO^d' J^U^i^tX^h, /P&ZstslSts' 
~H<asist&l4 Q/LC yUXs&l TwfcU, /wit. flJL&uJ-- 
UVL&zfci fa-USls sCz&v<^<? /lstrtc*sG> ^v4rg^y 



M.D. 



(3) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



dud ^eot^yA^^Q m<^u&L<u, ,a& a^u 
aJZ Axle. sjrZjfLejs Anu^e^LC, JUw^u 

■rra^d *d& £xsir cw, %£* cue, J^£ ii^q_ 
Q/rzwrf Vxsoi4st ziasisisq a^^uJ^ yt^t/ frnti' 



lim/r /frO^sZZ Vyfitli- zttrdt/ Vtd ,£&£ 






M. D. 

(41 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Jp 7/Clsdtt /WU QCLVUte -jiirjjstisrisls 











siAso 

jA^yj yctA4A£. 




"V&IAoC- 




-M.D. 



(5) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 






IrOsCWAfra/lC&C ?yu^k/ TLexz& CKyUU) 
ZrCiAyCC •jhn-vyrz./'tt stasis trrctcu /€<> 

CL4 ~jL^S&C4r<-£ T^^tl^Vc^t Z>UlsLscCc<-{. 



M.D. 

(6) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



yj/ JCLsf<Ji a>M/ J>rZ<&C -JLr^UsU^rw H*<c$ 
C^rvC^rui^t^ /Ufot^-US a£&cMc£<2 Au.^J^U 

&&SISZZSUC? Coo -Sour CtJ jLtrtsOMr^k ?xj£zl-*Ki 
fiTO- JsM Z-ZnzLc/ OAslCL \otsl*^£ Ad Ct/UU&44*£. 

nrcto cupvc^ "OwUs Jf&c^uui^vo- jhrrvytz^c&s/ 

to CO<L/LtL4SK£ /L4tl 24*Z<CCo^Ctst, je^-&&>C~ 
jltnstsfel^trl^/ J-^Lc /&& /OWMsC- /OS, /Co 

M. D. 

(7) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



f& s&cvKocl JtAMyt, a/rM>l4 Atskw- 
£ivt<£ yfcytyv /cu^nsvdlt jLrfet J&Le, 

It/ £teVU rf^O ZcM /Htyirl*U<MsU i 

■Lvov /tytciJkye^i^. /l&u&r IbiJtU, 
*7wrrC J£e^- fn^ -Au^i A^Oy- 

s&yirlyiyP Oy£ /gTyt-6 ^^^ , ?V> S&* 
KtsfsoeJl /hsriyiyiyiytyQ; yPPU, ZUy&yCt 



jy-CsT y^yPO, /Qy^Vlr^^yUO^Cy^yv <~T, ytfyU 



M.D. 

(8) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 




Jlji J.i&tfruw 7*L££ /£*Lc (?&&£J[ £>£CL* 



sfifo-6 jrr^- fa c&i*u<vwk 

yU^^lAr, Lstd*L4 /Dcls/l& /fitiic*L>& je^u^. 
tUAUsV Jrtst^u 2r*£tl /Usuvtsh "frvist 

/C^l<£ ss£?L4 sdr-C^s siasW Gt4sUC>£ ff&ts£ 




M.I). 



(9) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



ri.oaUiodi JM/?JLe aMhU<v M* 

irudAM JW&cJi srfnJ'uA: 0£C^nJU<y. MJt. 

j, „ ./? I J, , f ff 

ilL,* Me. we*. y : £L>^&e> JJ*J*i~*u* 
liJlirtJJU 'fort V*. ,£c*4su*sC %ma£oq a& A&aAi't 
fin TKeJx/alAr od£ A Jha^oM* %&*< 



-M.D. 



(10) 



Name. 



Diagnosis 



Result 



DR. WM, PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



7<uasisisuc? /Unlets cz/V /&i& &uz&a/ ?n££t; 
jahrvis&fl aJ^rlld /UzJtu- arOL£&d A^wJ- 

ZH^frs J^u^- asn4t> -Le^JtsCsiMs yi&<Ccvy- 
ul far y£zyi^v£) Z^d^zJ!' Cr&tW /oJ^-Af 

gA*s £&e> dr£ yd " A*edd ' fiMuJzUv 



M. D. 

(1) 




DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



5$. yOyU^u^ M&yf Ct^VXU> %C 

~£ir*r strict' /Lllw^stsrtZs&JU^'t^ 

^i^Jtyj/Cut^^y- */isist<V'<zsT-&i TTti^esisis fins Ct 

Hon- /L<<r£cts£e, /£&£ ta/rlkt, Oyl &4t4tisCo&>2' 
£t**t&4/ yjipc d*U jhi-e -Cvww /£&> <oiL 



m. a 

(2) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



^Uyte^oLt/ /l§w ?yi/C4l' otsryz^Q' li&a-gk 
J J-. A ■ y ~J..^. /., 



Jytrvzyt/Co fin^Sf yfez^tz*? /I'O't&sO' _£yC^-r^y- 

L ^p '.j-/. j.^^ J. .. 




/ 7 



M.D. 

(3) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



f ' J- J" p If b I 

Q/nh^t^ Ht^tAyt -U&suc*? sOtrir?jJf<s st>uv pnt£ 



_M. D. 

(4) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

3 19 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



CM sin*/ dhnvi<usis„ J^UA&o<Us (Xs£e<4 









&-e- 



M.D. 



(5) 



: 



• ; 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



CO& losVisSsCslr-i-t THyUU^n^^" itststsc6tsf_£ 



M.D. 

(6) 






N vS 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



£s<rtAVrtAstA> /L4Usi-US /X&C^loU JhA^/CeJt 
iiAMAc{, Cto/axiJLsi^i<<? fiun<t€L CArtAts&iAAje&iZ 



sffZrL&Cst JCX, c^U^OtJ'yvr UZA<4.J AW /fTcltsU 
/to /OAUsActcf A4l£. ZstrpU/ Wl> aaU J-t££ 

/U^-ftA /Ot^t^r ct-CiArUAA^o AAte. ZrirStAS jfo 
/aac^a^lI- ^r^c^v^c^r-cC oa /fate a^aajatA* 
&&4SC<sU<ct CtA jfbr cu) lLn/H*r<k ?hAaL-k4 

siAaatz^ Atst*^ fi&C^tscl*, ctZtesi- Tr&oadts a>£t 
w^- aaU, z-zr&tc/ aAytd JU&slJ- M ct/uuc^ue. 

fol^CAtst^tq APtf Vjfiocrtrr 7>lAAt> As**&-£a f^ 1 ^ 
<ZAst<tAiAl y&Lto /Ctsl4sl4r /U3 &GI/m£o£ Ira&ftvhoi,. 

OAtATL dWAtst, VctAA4ryir AA^tA^A- OslstrtSf Zrrt?LA 
to OALAAAsVlsU /frH£ Pl^CLAuyf-CLA JA-&CA7 
jLtnAstAArlst/ J -tit- A*~f% AAWAA>- A4> A<> 

(AAA /lAWAtsC-ebs^lg oi£&^ O^Ct&LlsUlA> , 



: M. D. 

(7) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/% -Jytcui^oC AjtccyT, Os>WL4 Al<>c& 
<a&&r2^oh /to (UrPz^t^w $u> ■/&&<?- 




74<t4n-& /t^Lesisu- "jHrVt/ls "rLt&iCt AsrZQs- 



M.D. 

(8) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



tpu, aJ^ts £JU Mc mc**^ ' 

M-wl. c+J<^> JaJU jt^Usu. j^^_ 
i^u^ wU, -U&L Iuuut^ 7t -A^t 

^^y. J£t Jirf^ ^ts axstsod Mo£ 



31. D. 



(9) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/• fij • #. ft // / J £ . 

flA<g<fct stesi'6tfy( fui^a&r- £><rt4*fi/re<L4/ /fab 



/1/vzjL /i/ts<^vz/u /isi/i/isi^x jsi/wcix/r (yv i"Tto/r<yiL>v/ /i/rl£ 

Avu?; CO ~hJyn^rvl \rfd M^tSt/ ^(UrT^sUr Tin- 
01/L& A^^j^ri^y^l^'^t^' /h^tZ^ ottn^i^^u<i 

yteej, jfytt JLuia §amo^U/ /cm* 'cow 
irStSc^ wet Jits®?! Tyi^ii /M& £U&e *z^T 

oMu,^ /£JL u/£4, J-JiL) !d%a, /^jn<^Hu<z£ 



M.D. 



(10) 



Name . 



Diagnosis 



Result 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



./|y /fcfetsists&L /yrCc^f ?y^>k^ Ct^r^i^ &<*. 

PK^&i &Z&£ Ct^Z<z^ iL&r£i<&&U/ s-T-&^c*s*-. 
/-Jluv $&* &u, curwv o&wzltsi-'uz ct^r 

^Z-6 &--lsZr#1<V /Usui 'pyt^l^^V /Dtljo/Q, /Viru^ 

aJL</ £&& /h4 yd M*JUv flJt*t*Ju£*/ 



I* 



M.D. 

(1) 




DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



M D. 

(2) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



Z^tt zh^tet^C/u /test*, /zz&in^ob; j^oJto^. 

M. Q^TTyt^yCeyU. * /&U/ Oim^ Zr7-&CtyC^U^2y£> 

t&t&ts ■ /Ztfvk' ?yi/L4i/ Otsywisa ~3tfyrfc 

/ /Z£<U?^6d> JsL£sLrC\sCL AfouytyTyty 

r^t^rda- 2iAAsQ/£^ 7wt&t4s sfc&e 

-ppotsvvciv QyZC /OUs&L 7>iyy%> /£&& flJuruJ-- 
c!Usi<y Jyk& ~hOyyt^^o Ct/U, /Ctrrft^i^ Glyy>~£- 
Cyyu-f (Uy^/yyt^yrc^a cxyyioC o^c&y^yyce^-c^ \ 

fadh- /lytri^/U. dyr^yty &Ai /QyA^ru^Coc^yiy 
JyVTyyt/Ca 'jhrUyt' yC^z^ceyp ■ /Itftoyts jtAy£s-r>' 

•^iruyv A?Li^zs&<7, ctyC<2^) <?b> To^LvyU ' A%& 
%&yt*yUs, ^Ccyx /Wit JHn-e-Cisyz^As fayy?- 



J-JLzyiyis Jstriyt^yy {yiUw'-Jy/ Jy> yWU f2*c£e. 

: k D. 

(3) 



iryi- 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. • 



J&s& -A^yU 



yyviA<?t. dsfr j!c*si/ out, s££z && spzce. sist*?. 



Q/Tlku TMsUdst M&st^st? '- 





s£&e> 






M.B. 



(4) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



J- f J- fT * J 




-M.D. 



(5) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 







IrZX<CyftVKZA^l6 TKJstl Tt&CisSl' Osl<U> 
/ofctPlsLst^s 7-PiUsftS /2sCtrz^&S A<%-*^-£- 



M.D. 



(6) 



\ . V o. ^ 



V 



> 5 



-v^ , .<,. 



X ' ' 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



£s(rt*yrv^u<? A4iArf-ZL/ a&C^te&a Al/J-Z'Xeft 

&ceslSC*SL&o£ COO 7-OVr OX! %^lyQ4^0<k ThoZZl-eict 
lUPTscku, /QA^t^ty^. J J /ClsOt4£ yislsts /£}>U<; MT3- 

frit* Q^Ct^UTU^i*? 10Ar11ytyCt^7^u i ?>?SL>&,-aUs£ 

ft-eto cutset &rU<s J&asuisi^o- jiWyyasrcLz/ 

_ M. I). 

(7) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



/jfc dsUtsi^ol jtSLUA' i CisnfrU} ACyptsttf 

/&yV l&C&n-^oh, /LClsfaUsl/Q ^H^J^U 

?&44L?l4st, Ji<^JytlsZyUy /£fLt 7<UyCOCZ 
J>U, fflrf/U /pzLo yCo/i /WistrU^COUsU, 

7nstrr€> /DtLtsuis- •jHrtsi/l/ -yUs(X>ot Aytn/Co- 

/Clylyfyl^t- TWytyC 



CsCl<OC*L& 



.C&Ms**' t - £ &'. 



M.D. 



(8) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 




&4> ytH^V CtXO sS&L&ls J^UeAs&OZ&C,. 

aiZid^ctsLi situ, su^dtf jL~r£ &>£&*%. 

AJpt*, trust 2aJUsUsC. 



lUsiUstl' yjristfos TrirlsU, /L-U2sisv£? "frvtsfc 

/tsZ^Tlf yfcpLe yCirt^Z. yl^slS Ctyt^OC JZXSU 



JI.D. 



(9) 



DR. WM. PERRIN NICOLSON, 

319 PRUDENTIAL BUILDING. 



cl£ro<Jh£w -fidd sum -lAU^A^uA, 

/A n^9^ 'a**&* p^-IU^ Cytw^/^a 'M* 

fuMkcU JMJkM cMrU^ U* 

i&aMA P^lcJe A^ o^a^iu.Al 

___ M.D. 

(10) 



Name 



Diagnosis 



Result 



Date Due 


























| 


























. 






























| 






































, 






















1 1